Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust Critique

The Trust provides a range of acute and specialist health services to well over three quaters of a million patients a year and is now a Foundation Trust.

Our application is underpinned by a new vision statement to compliment the Trust's Foundation status (2007)

Our vision is simple.....

'Working in partnership we want to be the first choice provider of health care services to the people of Portsmouth, South East Hampshire and beyond'.

The Trust would like to invite residents of Portsmouth and SE Hampshire to become members of our Foundation Trust.

If you have any problems visit a doctor immediatly to solve any issues regarding your health.

health symptoms

health problems

health and safety

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust


QUALITY ACCOUNTS 2009 – 2010
PORTSMOUTH HOSPITALS NHS TRUST
QUALITY ACCOUNTS
2009 – 2010
Quality Accounts 2009/10
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART 1 – STATEMENT ON QUALITY FROM CHIEF EXECUTIVE................................................... 3
PART 2 – PRIORITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT IN 2010/11 AND STATEMENTS OF ASSURANCE
FROM THE BOARD.......................................................................................................................... 5
Patient Safety ................................................................................................................................ 5
Objective one: Falls..................................................................................................................... 5
Objective two: Venous Thrombo-embolism (VTE)....................................................................... 5
Objective three: Pressure Ulcers................................................................................................. 5
Clinical Effectiveness..................................................................................................................... 5
Objective four: Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) .................................................... 5
Objective five: Clinical Audit ........................................................................................................ 6
Objective six: Early recognition of the deteriorating patient ......................................................... 6
Patient Experience ......................................................................................................................... 6
Objective seven: Privacy and Dignity .......................................................................................... 6
Objective eight: National In-Patient Survey ................................................................................. 6
Objective nine: Complaints.......................................................................................................... 6
Statement of assurance from the Board ......................................................................................... 7
Review of services......................................................................................................................... 7
Participation in clinical audits.......................................................................................................... 7
Research: Participation in clinical research................................................................................... 12
Goals agreed with commissioners ................................................................................................ 12
Statements from the CQC ............................................................................................................ 12
NHS Number and General Medical Practice Code Validity ........................................................... 15
Information Governance Toolkit attainment levels ........................................................................ 15
Clinical coding error rate............................................................................................................... 15
PART 3: REVIEW OF QUALITY PERFORMANCE.......................................................................... 16
Patient Safety ............................................................................................................................... 16
Patient Experience ....................................................................................................................... 23
Clinical Effectiveness................................................................................................................... 27
Workforce.................................................................................................................................... 30
Quality Account Statement 2010 PHT – NHS Portsmouth ........................................................... 32
Portsmouth Local Involvement Network (LINk) Commentary on Portsmouth Hospitals NHS
Trust (PHT) Quality Accounts 2009/10 .......................................................................................... 33
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 3 of 34
PART 1 – STATEMENT ON QUALITY FROM CHIEF EXECUTIVE
Our Vision is:
'To be recognised as a world-class hospital, leading the field through innovative healthcare solutions focused
on the best outcome for our patients delivered in a safe, caring and inspiring environment'.
We see the building blocks for achieving our vision as comprising excellence in care, staff and facilities.
Under each category we have set ourselves new strategic aims which are designed to facilitate measuring
and communicating how successful we have been. These are:
Best Care
· Provide best care as measured by clinical effectiveness, safety and the patient experience.
· Being the hospital of choice for patients.
Best People
· Achieve our strategic aims through living our values, and through the skills and personal development of
our staff.
· Being the employer of choice in South East Hampshire.
Best Hospital
· Be in the top quartile of NHS Hospitals for 95% of all of the services we provide.
· Work with our partners to create a sustainable economic enterprise which eliminates waste and provides
real value for money.
Through 2009/10 we have continued on our improvement journey and this is reflected in our first Quality
Account. We are proud of the progress we have made against our core objectives, whilst acknowledging that
we have a challenging agenda and there is no room for complacency.
This report demonstrates that we listen to what our patients tell us: we have continued to deliver excellent
infection control performance and we are committed to monitoring and improving patient safety. Quality of
care and patient safety are the Trust's highest priorities and we are focused on achieving the best outcomes
for our patients. We are disappointed at our achievement against some of the National Performance
Indicators and we are placing emphasis on turning this position around in 2010/11. Also disappointing were
the results in some areas of the national in-patient survey and we see improving our performance in these
areas as a top priority for us.
Our Quality Account 2009/10 establishes a baseline against which we will monitor our progress with safety
and quality in 2010/11.
In October 2009 the Trust was delighted to be rated as 'excellent' for quality of service by the Care Quality
Commission, the second consecutive year that the Trust has received this rating. Following a change in
systems by the Care Quality Commission, the Trust will no longer be the subject of 'ratings'. Instead the
Trust will be measured against compliance with the Essential Standards of Quality and Safety. The Trust
was successfully registered with the Care Quality Commission, without conditions, with effect from 1st April
2010.
For National Priorities, there are 13 indicators applicable to Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust. The Trust
anticipates achieving 9 of these indicators; underachieving against 2 indicators (breast feeding
initiation/smoking during pregnancy and staff satisfaction survey), and failing to achieve against 2 indicators
(18 weeks and quality of stroke care.) This would equate to an adequate rating for National Priorities.
For National Commitments, there are 10 indicators applicable to Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust. The Trust
has achieved 6 of the indicators; underachieved against 3 indicators (outpatients waiting longer than 13 week
standard, reperfusion waiting times and Accident and Emergency waiting times) and failed to achieve 1
indicator (delayed transfers of care). This would equate to a good rating for National Commitments.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 4 of 34
The Trust recognises the challenge for 2010/11 and aims to achieve all national targets and to provide high
quality care with good outcomes for all patient groups.
To the best of my knowledge the information and data contained within this Quality Account is accurate.
Ursula Ward
Chief Execitve
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 5 of 34
PART 2 – PRIORITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT IN 2010/11 AND STATEMENTS OF ASSURANCE FROM
THE BOARD
The Trust continues to develop Quality Indicators within our Quality Dashboard to monitor performance; this
is reviewed by the Board monthly. Divisions and clinical teams are developing their own quality dashboards
to monitor the important indicators in their specialty in addition to Trust priorities.
Priorities for the coming year have been identified through incident data, requirements of the Quality Contract
and as part of our ongoing patient safety work programme. Where appropriate, a review of current work
against each of the priorities can be found in Part 3 – Review of Quality Performance.
All of the 2010/11 objectives will be monitored by the Trust Board through quarterly reports.
Patient Safety
Objective one: Falls
A 10% reduction in severity of harm caused to patients as a result of a fall in hospital, using 2009/10 data as
a baseline.
Includes:
· Robust reporting.
· 100% risk assessment and falls plan for all patients.
· Increasing awareness of risk assessment and prevention strategies.
· Monitoring through the Falls Prevention Group and the Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Objective two: Venous Thrombo-embolism (VTE)
90% of adult inpatient admissions having had a VTE risk assessment.
Includes:
· Compliance with the requirements of CQUIN.
· Implementation of electronic surveillance through the introduction of the VitalPAC (a hand-held computer
system which monitors patients vital signs in real time) VTE module.
· Improving data collection through VitalPAC.
· All incidents being subject to appropriate Root Cause Analysis and investigation following a Serious
Untoward Incident panel meeting.
· Monitoring through the Patient Safety Working Group and the Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Objective three: Pressure Ulcers
A reduction in new grade 3 and 4 hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.
Includes:
· Compliance with the requirements of CQUIN.
· Robust reporting.
· 100% risk assessment and pressure ulcer prevention plan for all patients
· All grade 4 incidents being subject to a root cause analysis and Serious Untoward Incident panel
investigation.
· Monitoring through Pressure Ulcer Working Group and the Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Clinical Effectiveness
Objective four: Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR)
To achieve better than the National Average on HSMR rates.
Includes:
· Enhanced scrutiny of the number of deaths by specialty and deaths in low risk categories.
· Analysis of mortality within 30 days of a specific procedure being carried out.
· Analysis of patients re-admitted within 28 days of discharge.
· Monitoring through Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 6 of 34
Objective five: Clinical Audit
To show demonstrable service improvements as a result of Local and National Audits.
Includes:
· Divisional annual clinical audit reporting.
· Clinical Audit policy development.
· Priority based forward audit plans.
· Monitoring through Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Objective six: Early recognition of the deteriorating patient
Includes:
· Complete roll-out of VitalPAC.
· Electronic real time recording of observations through VitalPAC.
· Audit and data analsyis.
· Monitoring through the Patient Safety Working Group.
Patient Experience
Objective seven: Privacy and Dignity
Elimination of mixed sex accommodation as laid out in the 2010/11 NHS Operating Framework.
Includes:
· Completion of all building work (bathrooms and toilets).
· Robust data collection and reporting.
· Monitoring through the Nursing and Midwifery Advisory Committee.
Objective eight: National In-Patient Survey
To show a year-on-year improvement in scores
Includes:
· Compliance with CQUIN.
· Focus on five key questions from the Annual in-patient survey, as indicated within CQUIN.
· Monitoring through Clinical Standards and Quality Committee.
Objective nine: Complaints
A reduction in the total number of complaints received.
Includes:
· Improved local resolution of concerns to avoid formal complaints.
· Optimum – data collection and analysis of real time patient feedback.
· Action planning and implementation based on findings.
· Reporting of service improvements as a result of complaints.
· Monitoring through Governance and Quality Committee.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 7 of 34
Statement of assurance from the Board
Review of services
During 2009/2010 the Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust provided and/or sub-contracted 37 NHS services.
The Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has reviewed all the data available to them on the quality of care in all
37 of these NHS services.
The income generated by the NHS services reviewed in 2009/2010 represents 85% per cent of the total
income generated from the provision of NHS services by the Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust for 2009/2010.
The Trust has undertaken an initial review of the quality of care in all services and for the coming year will
undertake a more in-depth analysis.
Participation in clinical audits
During 2009/2010, 43 national clinical audits and 8 national confidential enquiries covered NHS services that
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust provides.
During that period Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust participated in 95% (41/43) national clinical audits and
100% (8/8) national confidential enquiries of the national clinical audits and national confidential enquiries
which it was eligible to participate in.
The national clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust was
eligible to participate in during 2009/2010 are listed in the table below.
The national clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
participated in during 2009/2010 are listed in the table below.
The national clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
participated in, and for which data collection was completed during 2009/2010, are listed below alongside the
number of cases submitted to each audit or enquiry as a percentage of the number of registered cases
required by the terms of that audit or enquiry.
National clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust was
eligible to participate in during 2009/2010
Participated
during 2009/2010
Major Complications of Airway Management in the UK - 4th National Audit Project
(NAP4) Participated
British Thoracic Society - Adult Asthma Participated
British Thoracic Society - Paediatric Asthma Participated
Asthma in Adults Participated
Blood Collection Process - NHSBT Participated
Audit of the use of red cells in neonates & children Participated
Bowel Cancer (NBOCAP) Participated
Head & Neck Cancer (DAHNO) Participated
Mastectomy & Breast Reconstruction (MBR) Participated
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 8 of 34
National clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust was
eligible to participate in during 2009/2010
Participated
during 2009/2010
National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) - LUCADA Participated
National Oesophago-Gastric Cancer Audit (NOGCA) Participated
Fractured Neck of Femur - CEM Participated
Pain in Children - CEM Participated
Cardiac Rhythm Mgt (pacing/implantable defibrillators) Participated
Coronary Interventions - BCIS (e.g. angioplasty, opening up heart artery) Participated
Heart Failure Participated
Myocardial ischaemia (MINAP) heart attack Participated
National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation (NACR) Participated
National Diabetes Audit (09/10) Not participated
National In-patient Diabetes Audit Participated
National Joint Registry (NJR) Participated
National Audit of Dementia Participated
Multicentre Audit of current practice of Radiographically Inserted Gastrostomy tube in
UK Participated
National Audit of Continence Care - Clinical Not participated
National Audit of Continence Care - Organisational Participated
National Carotid Interventions Audit - preventing stroke (Carotid Endarterectomy - CEA,
part of the National Vascular Database) Round 2 Participated
National Falls and Bone Health Audit Programme (Services for people who have
fallen) - Falls Patient Involvement Project 2009 Participated
National Sentinel Stroke Audit - Organisation Of Stroke Care Participated
Parkinson's Disease Society Audit Tool: Service Description Audit & New Patient
Audit
Participated
National Audit of Mini Screws / Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) Participated
National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) Participated
National Study on Bisphosphonate related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws Participated
National Vascular Database (Aortic aneurysm, infrainguinal bypass and amputation
operations)
Participated
Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) - Abdominal and Spinal Injuries Participated
Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) - Orthopaedic Injuries Participated
Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) - Thoracic Injuries Participated
Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) - Head Injuries Participated
British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) Participated
National Neonatal Audit Programme (NNAP) Participated
Staging of Uterine Cancer 2009 Participated
Patient Related Outcome Measures (PROMs) Groin Hernia Participated
PROMS – Knee Replacement Participated
PROMS – Hip Replacement Participated
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 9 of 34
National clinical audits and national confidential enquiries that Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust was
eligible to participate in during 2009/2010
Participated
during 2009/2010
PROMS - Varicose Vein Participated
Acute Kidney Injury: Adding Insult to Injury Participated
Deaths in Acute Hospitals: Caring to the End Participated
Parenteral Nutrition Participated
Elective & Emergency Surgery in the Elderly (EESE) Participated
Surgery in Children Participated
Peri-Operative Care Study Participated
Maternal deaths Participated
Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health (CEMACH) - Head Injury in
Children Participated
We do not have complete data for the percentage rate of submitted cases for each of the above audits. This
will be included in our next account.
The reports of 24 national clinical audits were reviewed by the provider in 2009/2010 and Portsmouth
Hospitals NHS Trust intends to take the following actions to improve the quality of healthcare provided.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust intends to improve further the processes for monitoring the
recommendations of National Audits and Confidential Enquiries for 2010/11 by ensuring:
· All published reports are easily accessible on the Clinical Audit Intranet Site.
· The results, recommendations and associated action plans of National Audits will be presented to the
Clinical Standards and Quality Committee for monitoring.
· The newly established Governance Leads Forum, reporting to the Clinical Standards and Quality
Committee is made aware of published reports and discusses Trust-wide implications of the
recommendations and validates the resulting action plans.
Examples of actions being taken:
Blood Collection Process
This report was discussed at our Hospital Transfusion Committee and at our Governance and Quality
Committee. As the Trust was following the national guidelines and had achieved 100% against all the
required standards, no further actions were necessary.
National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) – LUCADA
The lung cancer Multi Disciplinary Team (MDT) determined that the most effective way they could enhance
their service with reference to the LUCADA data, was by improving the accuracy and completeness of the
data submitted to the audit. Previous audits had highlighted that some data points had not been captured
which affected data completeness. Therefore, this year the team have changed the way they run their MDT
meetings with the focus being to improve the quality of data captured with the use of a pro-forma to ensure
that all key data points are recorded.
National Oesophago-Gastric Cancer Audit (NOGCA)
We have been successful in providing 100% data and have already reviewed our data at a recent Network
Peer Review. We have set up a work programme to implement the actions required.
The Action plan for Upper Gastro Intestinal (UGI) MDT for 2010-2016 is to:
1. Improve the dietetic input into the UGI MDT which has been recognised as a vital part of the care of
these patients but is currently under provisioned.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 10 of 34
2. Shorten the care pathway of our patients by providing on site scanning.
3. Continue to develop and improve minimal access surgery for these patients through investment in
equipment and staffing.
Coronary Interventions - BCIS (e.g. angioplasty, opening up heart artery)
We contribute all of our results to this national dataset. Our data is presented locally to the network at least
twice annually and our volumes and outcomes are comfortably within expected limits.
National Falls and Bone Health Audit Programme (Services for people who have fallen) - Falls Patient
Involvement Project 2009
An example of service improvements, some of which have commenced and are on-going, include:
· To establish a multi-professional working group to develop and implement a Fast Track protocol from
Emergency Department to ward - aim for patients to reach Orthopaedic ward within 2 hours.
· To develop a protocol for nursing assessment and management in line with Royal College of Physicians
clinical audit indicators to include supporting documentation.
· To ensure routine pre-op assessment by orthogeriatrician.
· Ensure that all appropriate patients are referred to a falls clinic according to existing pathways i.e.
Recurrent, unexplained or single fallers with gait and balance disorders.
· To develop poster and patient leaflets for use in fracture clinic to better inform patients of the need for
bone health treatment.
National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD)
Our results were very good and some of the actions being taken are similar to those being taken in the
National Falls Programme.
· To define and implement a Fast Track protocol from Emergency Department to ward - aim for patients to
reach Orthopaedic ward within 2 hours.
· Prioritising of hip fracture patients on trauma list - aim for surgery within 36 hours unless medically
unstable, in line with best practice tariff (achieved in 76% last year).
· Continued collaborative working between Orthopaedics, Orthogeriatrics and Anaesthetics.
· "Lean" review of processes from Emergency Department, to the ward, to surgery and Day 1 post-op.
· Currently reviewing the pathway from Orthopaedic ward to discharge - aim is to facilitate more patients
discharged straight home from acute.
· Regular multidisciplinary team meetings to review rehab progress and drive discharge.
· Review of physiotherapy and occupational therapy input to hip fracture patients.
· The new hip fracture pathway documentation is due to be implemented 1st August 2010.
· Continue to input robust data to NHFD, including all follow up.
Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) - Abdominal and Spinal Injuries/ Orthopaedic Injuries/
Thoracic Injuries
· To ensure proper trauma CT protocols are agreed with Radiology, making it easier to get Trauma CT's.
· To ensure all trauma admissions are assessed in the new resuscitation area with appropriately skilled
staff.
· To continue to improve communication with surgeons for more efficient trauma calls.
Deaths in Acute Hospitals: Caring to the End National Confidential Enquiry
· To review consultant on call arrangements.
· To Improve handover arrangements between shifts in preparation for Hospital at Night
· To undertake a review of all trainee rotas to match demands on service.
· To change culture of trainees to seek senior input particularly after hours - convey best practice at times
of new trainee intake.
· To ensure roll out of VitalPAC to all ward areas.
· To increase number of agreed algorithms for diagnostic pathways for common surgical conditions.
· To introduce an electronic flagging system to ensure communication of critical, urgent or unexpected
radiological findings.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 11 of 34
The reports of 122 local clinical audits were reviewed by the provider in 2009/2010 and Portsmouth Hospitals
NHS Trust intends to take the following actions to improve the quality of healthcare provided.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust intends to improve further the processes for monitoring the
recommendations of Local Clinical Audits for 2010/11 by ensuring:
· All Specialties develop a prioritised Clinical Audit forward audit programme.
· The audit actions are implemented and a re-audit is planned to ensure sustained improvements can be
demonstrated.
· A Clinical Audit Policy is to be developed to ensure audit leads are accountable for ensuring
implementation of actions and each specialty develops their own Annual Clinical Audit report.
Examples of actions being taken:
Audit of Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) Usage on Acute Division of Medicine for Older People (DMOP)
Wards
Results were encouraging however LCP needs further promotion in DMoP. This will be carried out by:
1. Continuing to use DMoP lunchtime meetings to teach on prognosis and promote LCP usage.
2. Results being shown and LCP promoted at DMoP Rolling Half Day.
3. By DMoP nurses to spend time on Charles ward to see LCP in use.
4. By the End of Life Care Steering Group using audit results to support presentation to PHT Board
requesting further investment in the Hospital Palliative Care team (who could educate and support LCP
usage).
Intra-operative assessment of axillary sentinel lymph nodes (SLN)
The Times and the Daily Mail recently ran a story about how 500 women with breast cancer who have been
treated at the Trust have now had their chances of needing a second operation cut, by finding out if their
disease has spread during initial surgery for the tumour. This is done by using the Breast Lymph Nodes
Assay procedure and involves checking the glands and lymph nodes under the arms to see if the cancer has
already spread at the same time as a patient has surgery to remove an initial tumour. Portsmouth Hospitals
NHS Trust was the first Trust in the country to introduce this test in 2007. Recommendations implemented;
it is now our standard of care. (Recognition received in the Sunday Times on 31 October 2009)
Audit of the use of COX2 inhibitors amongst the Rheumatology Department between December 2007
and December 2008- NICE TAG 27 NOW CG79
· An action plan was agreed following presentation of the findings of this audit to the Department. This
included an undertaking to document reasons for COX-2 use over alternative NSAIDs in the patient notes
and a commitment to increase the awareness of risk associated with their use.
· A re-audit is planned in 1 year's time after raising awareness of the revised guidelines within the
department.
Audit of 'How effective is the emergency department in the identification and early management of
patients with severe sepsis?'
An action plan was agreed to include:
· A teaching session for Emergency Department nurses in February 2010.
· Education posters for the department to be produced.
· ID badge aide-memoire to be produced.
· Re-audit following education is due to take in 2010.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 12 of 34
Research: Participation in clinical research
The number of patients receiving NHS services provided or sub contracted by Portsmouth Hospitals NHS
Trust in 2009/2010, who were recruited during that period to participate in research approved by a research
ethics committee, was 3268. Of these, 3136 were recruited into 142 studies adopted under the National
NIHR Portfolio. This compared with 901 patients from 104 Portfolio studies ongoing in the previous year (an
increase in accruals of 248%).100 were recruited into non-Portfolio studies (NB: it should be noted that
systems for recording non-portfolio activity are presently under-developed and that the accuracy of non-
Portfolio accrual data will improve over time).
There has been a significant increase in research activity in Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust during
2009/2010. The Research Department has seen a 50% rise in applications submitted; an 80% increase in
the numbers of projects approved; a 60% increase in the numbers of projects open to recruitment during the
year and an 88% rise in NIHR Portfolio studies open and in the active phase. In total, Portsmouth Hospitals
NHS Trust has participated in 243 ongoing research projects during 2009-2010, showing a 17% improvement
on April 2008 to March 2009.
This increasing level of participation in clinical research demonstrates Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trusts'
commitment to improving the quality of care we offer and to making our contribution to wider health
improvement. Our research activity spans across all of the clinical divisions and there is commitment from the
Trust Board, Research department, clinical specialities and professional groups that patient participation in
high quality research must be supported. Active promotions of the NIHR Portfolio database and
improvements in research capacity and infrastructure have been key strategic objectives; those have been
successfully under-pinned with external funding from Hampshire and Isle of Wight Comprehensive Local
Research Network (HIOW CLRN). In addition, Portsmouth Hospitals is the lead organisation for 16 studies
ongoing within 2009-2010; has secured 2 NIHR 'Research for Patient Benefit' grants; and is a co-applicant
on a large prestigious grant award from the Medical Research Council.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has used national systems in the research governance and management of
studies in proportion to risk. These include governance checks using NIHR standard operating procedures;
national model template agreements; national costing templates for industry-sponsored Portfolio research;
and national guidance for the (HR) management of external researchers and use of the NHS research
passport.
Appendix 1 shows the Trust Research Activity Summary.
Goals agreed with commissioners
A proportion of Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust income in 2009/2010 was conditional on achieving quality
improvement and innovation goals agreed between Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust and any person or body
they entered into a contract, agreement or arrangement with for the provision of NHS services, through the
Commissioning for Quality and Innovation payment framework.
Further details of the agreed goals for 2009/2010 and for the following 12 month period are available on
request from Governance Compliance Manager, Room 1.27, Old Health Records Building, Queen Alexandra
Hospital, Cosham, Hampshire, PO6 3LY.
Statements from the CQC
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust is required to register with the Care Quality Commission and its current
registration status is 'Registered'.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has the following conditions on registration: no conditions applied.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 13 of 34
The Care Quality Commission has not taken enforcement action against Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
during 2009/2010.
With effect from 1st April 2010 the following was registered with the Care Quality Commission:
Location Regulated Activity Service Type Service User
Band
Queen Alexandra Hospital
(QAH)
Southwick Hill Road
Cosham
Portsmouth
Hampshire
PO3 6AD
· Treatment of disease, disorder
and injury
· Surgical procedures
· Diagnostic and screening
procedures
· Maternity and midwifery
services
· Termination of pregnancies
· Acute services
· Rehabilitation
services
· Whole
population
St. Mary's Hospital (SMH)
Milton Road
Portsmouth
Hampshire
PO6 3LY
· Treatment of disease, disorder
and injury
· Surgical procedures
· Diagnostic and screening
procedures
· Maternity and midwifery
services
· Termination of pregnancies
· Acute services
· Rehabilitation
services
· Whole
population
Gosport War Memorial
Hospital (GWMH)
Bury Road
Gosport
Hampshire
PO12 3PW
· Treatment of disease, disorder
and injury
· Diagnostic and screening
procedures
· Maternity and midwifery
services
· Acute services
· Rehabilitation
services
· Urgent Care
Services
· Whole
population
Petersfield Hospital (PH)
Swan Street
Petersfield
Hampshire
GU32 3LB
· Treatment of disease, disorder
and injury
· Diagnostic and screening
procedures
· Maternity and midwifery
services
· Acute services
· Rehabilitation
services
· Whole
population
In addition, the Trust has applied for Registration of its three renal satellite units to carry out the regulated
activity of 'Treatment of disease, disorder or injury' and to carry out the regulated activity of 'Assessment or
medical treatment for persons detained under the 1983 mental Health Act' at each of its locations. At the
time of writing, the Trust is waiting to hear from the Care Quality Commission regarding registration of these
additional locations and regulated activities.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust is subject to periodic reviews by the Care Quality Commission and the last
review was in October 2009 (for the review period 1st April – 31st March 2008). The CQC's assessment of the
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust following that review was 'Excellent'.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust intends to take the following action to address the points made in the CQC's
assessment.
· The Trust underachieved in the target of 'Stroke care'. However the Trust provides a model of care that
does not currently fit with the Care Quality Commission measurement to achieve the target. Not all our
patients are admitted directly to a dedicated stroke unit and, although they receive the appropriate care
from a multi-disciplinary team in other clinical areas, this does not meet the criteria for reporting purposes.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 14 of 34
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has made the following progress by 31st March 2010 in taking such action.
· The introduction of the 'Accelerating Stroke Improvement Metrics' has prompted discussions with the
Commissioners to establish achievement of these by 2011. Meetings have been arranged for June 2010.
· Work is on-going to progress the feasibility of designated beds on the Medical Assessment Unit.
· There are further plans to look at options to improve direct admission to the stroke unit.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has participated in special reviews or investigations by the Care Quality
Commission relating to the following areas during 2009/2010:
· Prevention and control of infections.
· Children's Services Mapping – data submitted February 2010 the validation process is currently
underway, the outcome of the exercise has, at the time of writing, yet to be published.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust intends to take the following action to address the conclusions or
requirements reported by the CQC.
Prevention and control of infections
In May 2009 the Care Quality Commission conducted an unannounced inspection of Queen Alexandra
Hospital. The Trust was fully compliant in eight out of the nine measured areas. Within the eight areas
assessors were impressed with the Trust's effective arrangements for the cleaning of wards and equipment
and the facilities for the public to practice good cleanliness. In the ninth measure, a small amount of dust was
found on the curtains of one ward which the Trust took very seriously and put extra cleaning measures in
place. After a follow-up unannounced inspection in August 2009 the Trust was fully compliant in all nine
measured areas. Assessors praised specific areas such as patient beds, trolleys, bedside furniture, stands,
fixtures and fittings for being cleaned to a good standard. This means that we have the legal right to deliver
healthcare under these requirements.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has made the following progress by 31st March 2010 in taking such action.
The Trust is now fully compliant with all nine measures below:
1. Performing a programme of audit to ensure that policies and practices are being followed.
2. Having cleaning arrangements that detail the standards of cleanliness required and making cleaning
schedules available to the public.
3. Having an adequate provision of suitable hand-washing facilities and antibacterial hand rub.
4. Using effective arrangements for the appropriate decontamination of instruments and other equipment,
which are detailed in appropriate policies.
5. Having a policy for uniforms and work wear to ensure that staff wear clothing that is clean and fit for
purpose.
6. Providing patients and the public with general information on how the Trust is preventing and controlling
infections, and providing other service users involved in the transfer of patients with key policy
information.
7. Providing or securing adequate isolation facilities.
8. Following appropriate policies and protocols on the prescription of antimicrobial drugs.
9. Ensuring that the environment for providing healthcare is suitable, clean and well maintained.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 15 of 34
NHS Number and General Medical Practice Code Validity
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust submitted records during 2009/2010 to the Secondary Uses service for
inclusion in the Hospital Episode Statistics which are included in the latest published data. The percentage of
records in the published data:
- which included the patient's valid NHS number was:
97.4% for admitted patient care (national average 98%);
98.8% for out patient care (national average 98.2%); and
93.8% for accident and emergency care (national average 89.5%).
- which included the patient's valid General Medical Practice Code was:
100.0% for admitted patient care (national average 99.9%);
100.0% for out-patient care (national average 99.8%); and
100.0% for accident and emergency care (national average 99.5%).
The Trust scores for data quality are close to in one case and exceeds in five cases, the national average.
Information Governance Toolkit attainment levels
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust score for 2009/2010 for Information Quality and Records Management
assessed using the Information Governance Toolkit was 84%.
There is no national average score for this Information Governance measure; however the overall
compliance score for the Information Governance Toolkit is 70%. Therefore we are assured of good
information management within the organisation.
Clinical coding error rate
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust was subject to the Payment by Results clinical coding audit during the
reporting period by the Audit Commission and the error rates reported in the latest published audit for that
period for diagnoses and treatment coding (clinical coding) were:
Primary Diagnoses Incorrect: 9.3% (90.7% accuracy)
Secondary Diagnoses Incorrect: 4.9% (95.1% accuracy)
Primary Procedures Incorrect: 7.4% (92.6% accuracy)
Secondary Procedures Incorrect: 11.6% (88.4% accuracy)
The Trust continues to maintain consistent coding practice.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 16 of 34
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
MRSA bacteraemia > 48 hours from admission
12-month rolling total
63 64 63 62
58 56
51 52 51
43 45
37
29
20 18 16 16 14 14 14
11 12
9 8 6
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Apr 05 - Mar 06
Jul 05 - Jun 06
Oct 05 - Sep 06
Jan 06 - Dec 06
Apr 06 - Mar 07
Jul 06 - Jun 07
Oct 06 - Sep 07
Jan 07 - Dec 07
Apr 07 - Mar 08
Jul 07 - Jun 08
Oct 07 - Sep 08
Jan 08 - Dec 08
Apr 08 - Mar 09
Jul 08 - Jun 09
Oct 08 - Sep 09
Jan 09 - Dec 09
Apr 09 - Mar 10
no of cases
PART 3: REVIEW OF QUALITY PERFORMANCE
The past year has been a very challenging one for Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust. The single largest
'event' of 2009/10 was the completion of the redeveloped Queen Alexandra Hospital in June 2009 and
formally opened by the Princess Royal in October. The new facilities won the national Best Building Award at
the Health Business Awards in December 2009 and enables us to deliver an enhanced range of services to
patients and to flex the facilities as clinical needs change.
During this period, thanks to the commitment and hard work of all our staff, we have had a year of further
achievement in delivering high quality healthcare to our patients. The Trust is continuously striving to
provide the people of Portsmouth and far beyond with an excellent standard of care.
Patient Safety
We are proud of our achievement in delivering the reduction in the incidence of Methicillin Resistant
Staphyococcus Aureus (MRSA) cases. The Trust year end position (April 2009 – March 2010) is 19 cases of
MRSA against a target of no more than 22. Whilst this is good, our ambition is to reduce the number further.
The graph below shows the reduction in MRSA bacteraemia since April 2005 (rolling 12 month total).
The graph below shows the reduction of MRSA bacteraemias for the year 2009/10.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
Count of MRSA bacteraemia
0
1
2
3
4
Apr-
09
May-
09
Jun-
09
Jul-
09
Aug-
09
Sep-
09
Oct-
09
Nov-
09
Dec-
09
Jan-
10
Feb-
10
Mar-
10
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 17 of 34
To reduce the number of MRSA cases within the Trust, a MRSA Screening programme has been introduced.
The Trust complies with Department of Health guidelines which say that relevant patients who are coming in
to hospital for planned treatment should be screened for MRSA.
The Trust has adopted early MRSA screening of all emergency patients since 2008; this is three years earlier
than the Department of Health target of 2011.
We also surpassed our target for the incidence of Clostridium Difficile (C.diff) cases. The Trust year end
position (April 2009 – March 2010) is 115 cases of C.diff against a target of no more than 263 (an
improvement of 72 on the previous year). We will continue to work with our Primary Care Trust colleagues to
reduce further both community-acquired and hospital-acquired infection.
The graph below shows the reduction in C.Diff cases since April 2007 (12 month rolling total).
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
Clostridium difficile cases > 48 hours from admission
12-month rolling total
110 111 133 121
153
168
184
206 204
246 235
264
296
100
150
200
250
300
350
Apr 07 - Mar 08
Jun 07 - May 08
Aug 07 - Jul 08
Oct 07 - Sep 08
Dec 07 - Nov 08
Feb 08 - Jan 09
Apr 08 - Mar 09
Jun 08 - May 09
Aug 08 - Jul 09
Oct 08 - Sep 09
Dec 08 - Nov 09
Feb 09 - Jan 10
Apr 09 - Mar 10
no of cases
The graph below shows the cases of C.diff for the 2009/10.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust Monthly
Count of Cdiff cases identified more than 48 hours after
admission to hospital
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Apr-
09
May-
09
Jun-
09
Jul-
09
Aug-
09
Sep-
09
Oct-
09
Nov-
09
Dec-
09
Jan-
10
Feb-
10
Mar-
10
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 18 of 34
The Infection Prevention and Control Team have devised a dashboard which is presented to Trust
Executives and Non-Executive Directors in Board meetings, and provides monthly details of:
· Progress against MRSA and C.difficile trajectories
· MRSA screening for elective and emergency admissions
· Outbreaks
· Hand Hygiene
· Management of Infection related Serious Untoward Incidents (SUIs).
The team were approached by South Central Ambulance Service to provide consultancy on infection control,
decontamination, outbreak management, infectious diseases and Care Quality Commission registration.
Reducing infection through public engagement
The Trust has demonstrated its commitment to safety by signing up to the National Patient Safety First
Campaign, the vision of which is of an NHS with no avoidable death or harm.
As part of this we have signed up to the evidence-based interventions, which include:
· Identification of and response to the deteriorating patient.
· Reducing central line infections and ventilator associated pneumonia.
· Reducing harm through improvements in perioperative practice (WHO Surgical Safety Checklist)
· Reducing harm from high risk medications.
As part of the campaign we are also participating in the 'Matching Michigan' project. This project is a UK
national initiative sponsored by the Patient Safety Agency, with full support from the UK Intensive Care
Society. It is targeting a reduction in the rate of bloodstream infections related to Central Venous Catheters
(CVC) in the intensive care unit (ICU). The Trust signed up and went live with this project on December 1st
2009, at the start of the national roll-out.
In the first 2 months of the Matching Michigan data we have 0 catheter-related blood stream infections in 460
CVC days.
In addition to the Trust signing up to the National Patient Safety First Campaign we are also supporting the
Strategic Health Authority Patient Safety Federation work programme, which encourages all the local
healthcare organisations to collaborate and share learning around their patient safety initiative.
The Infection Prevention and Control Team were awarded
third place at the Oxoid Infection Control Team of the Year
Awards for 2009 for excellent communication of infection
prevention and control issues within the hospital and the
wider community.
The Stop the Bugs campaign, launched in 2008, continued
to raise public awareness of the fight against hospital
infection. The campaign involved the local press, the use of
posters on buses, billboards at bus stops and activities in
local schools: feedback indicates the great impact of
children impressing the need for good hygiene on their
parents.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 19 of 34
In October 2009, as part of the Leading Improvements in Patient Safety Programme, we agreed a set of
ambitious goals for improving patient safety for our patients and reducing avoidable harm. This work focuses
on six priority areas (detailed below), and we have established measures to help us determine how
successful we are being at driving improvements in these areas. Our goals will be reviewed as we achieve
against them and we will share our achievements and challenges in this and future reports.
Six priority areas for 2009/10
· Falls
· Venous Thrombo-embolism (VTE)
· Pressure Ulcers
· Medical Outliers
· Leadership for safety
· WHO Surgical Checklist implementation
Falls
The table below shows the numbers of falls for 2009/10 compared against 2008/09 (please note that at the
time of writing March data had yet to be verified).
Falls – 2008/09 : 2009/10
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct -09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar -10
08/09
09/10
Target 09/10
There are a number of initiatives going on within the Trust which focus on falls reduction. These will assist
with achieving our target in 2010/11:
· There is a Falls Pathway implementation programme in progress on the renal unit and ward D6 working
with the ward-based falls champions and the practice development teams.
· An updated Falls Assessment and Care Plan document is now available.
· A trial of a new extra low profiling bed has been successfully completed, with favourable results.
· A Clinical Governance Award has been granted. It is intended to use this money to support the
programme of work in relation to patients at very high risk of falls.
· The Trust is taking part in a national clinical trial run by Portsmouth University to test a new shock
absorbing flooring material to reduce injury should a patient fall, commenced on 20th April for a period of
18 months.
· The Trust continues to encourage reporting of falls in order that we can learn from incidents and improve
practice as a result.
Venous Thrombo-embolism (VTE)
Additional systems have been put in place for all inpatient VTE events to be reported via the Adverse
Incident Reporting (AIR) scheme. Events are coded amber; notes are then investigated to see whether
appropriate VTE prevention strategies were put in place for the patients concerned. If all appropriate action is
seen to have been taken, the event is logged and no further action taken. If all preventative measures are not
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 20 of 34
in place, cases are taken to a 48 hour panel where it is decided whether further action needs to be taken and
a full SUI investigation carried out.
The Trust achieved VTE Exemplar Centre status in 2009; this highlighted the Trust as a national centre of
excellence in VTE prevention. The Trust was able to demonstrate VTE guidelines and risk assessment tools
for each specialty, evidence of raising staff and public awareness, evidence of root cause analysis on inpatient
VTE events and a willingness to share best practice with other healthcare organisations.
Pressure Ulcers
The table below shows the numbers of pressure ulcers (all grades) for 2009/10 compared against 2008/09
(please note that at the time of writing March data has yet to be verified).
Pressure Ulcers – 2008/09 : 2009/10
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct -09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar -10
08/09
09/10
The Trust has seen an increase in the reporting of pressure ulcer incidences following a significant amount of
work to raise awareness and encourage identification and reporting of pressure ulcers.
The Tissue Viability Team continues to work proactively with clinical areas to support in the management of
pressure ulcers. A Pressure Ulcer Working Group has been established to drive forward the implementation
of a Trust wide strategy to reduce pressure ulcers.
Safer Surgery
Safer Surgery
In July 2009 the Trust implemented an adapted version of the World Health
Organisation (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist for implementation within all
operating theatres at Queen Alexandra Hospital.
Following implementation of the checklist, the Trust undertook an audit and
staff survey to determine the effectiveness of the form and has since further
revised the checklist and will be implementing this and team briefings in
May 2010. When introduced, this will mean that before each surgical procedure,
teams will have a briefing to ensure that every member of staff is clear on their
role and responsibility. The lead surgeon and anaesthetist will explain the procedure
and patient background, and ensure that any anticipated problems are discussed
and shared with the team.
The Trust is a study site as part a multi-centre national study by Imperial College looking at the introduction
of the WHO checklist.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 21 of 34
Early recognition of the deteriorating patient
There has been significant progress made in relation to the early recognition of the deteriorating patient.
This work has been recognised by a national patient safety award.
National Patient Safety Award 2010 WINNER!
VitalPAC, technology co-developed by the Trust and The Learning Clinic Ltd. has been commended for
improving patient safety in a national awards scheme.
Serious Untoward Incidents (SUIs)
All incidents are reported through the Trust Incident Reporting Systems and all red or potential red incidents
are subject to a panel review (first panel within 48 hours) and full root cause analysis investigation prior to
being presented to the Serious Incident Review Group (SIRG). This group is chaired by the Medical Director
or Chief Nurse who approve the final reports prior to submission to the Primary Care Trust.
There have been significant improvements in the SUI process and management over the last year which has
been acknowledged by our Commissioners. The Board receives monthly SUI updates.
SIRG seeks to ensure that all significant events are actively investigated and improvement plans are
delivered to ensure lessons learnt and subsequent risk reduction. The group has seen growing engagement
from senior clinicians, nurses and Commissioners.
The total Number of SUIs in 2009/10 (excluding those relating to infection control) compared with 2008/09
can be seen in the chart below:
SUIs: 2008/09 : 2009/10
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Apr -09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct -09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar-10
08/09
09/10
VitalPAC, a hand-held computer system which monitors patients vital signs in real
time, was co-developed by Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust and The Learning
Clinic Ltd. It won the 'Technology and IT to Improve Patient Safety' award at the
national Patient Safety Awards in February 2010. Patient vital signs data can then
be viewed anywhere in the hospital by staff using PCs. Professor Smith, the team
leader, said: "The system allows us to observe patients better, detect deterioration
earlier and ensure early intervention by nurses and doctors in a sick patient's care.
This increases the chance of a better outcome for the patient. Early research data
suggests that VitalPAC may be having a significant effect on reducing mortality
within the hospital".
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 22 of 34
The total number of SUIs in 2008/09 was 102 compared to 65 in 2009/10 demonstrating a significant
reduction. The rise in reported SUIs for March 2010 is attributed to grade 4 pressure ulcers, previously not
reported as a SUI.
Never Events
Never Events are serious, largely preventable patient safety incidents that should not occur if the available
preventative measures have been implemented.
Primary care trusts are required to monitor the occurrence of never events within the trust and publicly report
them on an annual basis.
In 2009/10 the Trust reported zero never events.
Monitoring and data analysis
The Trust has also been monitoring the rate of harmful events as measured by a monthly review of a random
set of patient notes using a national tool. The use of this technique helps to identify areas where care could
be improved, and allow for feedback to clinical areas on areas which are not necessarily picked up through
other review methods.
Another focus for the year has been on establishing a more rigorous structure for overseeing and measuring
whether our processes are safe and effective. We have introduced a Patient Safety Working Group and also
a Serious Incident Review Group so that we can be assured that we are learning from errors made across
the organisation.
On a monthly basis the Board reviews a range of clinical metrics. These are reported on a rolling basis so
that we can quickly identify trends of improvement or deterioration across areas such as infection rates,
patient falls, pressure ulcers and medication errors.
An information analysis and reporting system provided by Dr Foster called Real Time Monitor also supports
the Trust with the review of data. This system helps the Trust to closely monitor its own performance and
also how the performance rates against other hospitals across the country.
In December 2009, Dr Foster placed the Trust in band 4, out of a possible 5 for patient safety (5 being the
highest). The statistics emphasise that we continue to improve in many areas but we will continue to use the
data to provide focus for future improvements.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 23 of 34
Patient Experience
The Trust has focused more on what our patients and their families and carers experience whilst they are in
our care, and how we can work more effectively within the hospital and with our partners to improve their
experiences. We have introduced a real time patient feedback solution, supported by Information
Technology. This patient feedback function has been a vital part of our desire to build an organisation that is
open to feedback, learns from mistakes, and wants to put our patients' needs at the heart of what we do.
Real time patient feedback
The National Inpatients survey provides the Trust with a snapshot of what patients are saying about their
experience. In order to gather continual feedback the Trust has purchased the Optimum system for capturing
patient experience in near-real time. This system allows for a number of surveys to be completed in a variety
of ways such as on-line; at a booth situated in the main entrance of the hospital; through hand-held
devices for use when interviewing patients in clinical areas and paper copies available at departments. The
surveys available on the system are Inpatients, Outpatients, Cancer Services, Maternity, Stroke and
Discharge from Hospital.
Clinicians and managers are able to access the system from Board to operational level by division and
department to see what patients are saying and where improvements to patients experience can be made.
We are currently working to produce key performance indicators to reflect the feedback received and ensure
actions are taken.
National Inpatient Survey 2009
We undertook the National Survey of Adult Inpatients in 2009. 850 questionnaires were sent with 458 having
been completed and returned, equating to a 56% final response rate, compared to a National response rate
of 52%.
Please note: the scores are not percentages, so a score of 80 does not mean that 80% of people who have
used services in the trust have had a particular experience, it means that the trust has scored 80 out of a
maximum of 100.
Optimum system in use at the main enterance to the hospital
Hand held
device in use
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 24 of 34
The following areas showed an improvement of at least 5 points since 2008:
Statement 2008 2009
Did you ever share a sleeping area with patients of the opposite sex? 66 76
Did you have somewhere to keep your personal belongings whilst on the ward? 59 66
The following areas showed a decline of at least 5 points since 2008:
Statement 2008 2009
Upon arrival, did you feel that you had to wait a long time to get to a bed on a
ward? 80 62
How do you feel about the length of time you were on the waiting list? 85 78
How would you rate the hospital food? 57 46
Did you get enough help from staff to eat your meals? 75 63
Did a member of staff explain what would be done during the operation or
procedure? 87 82
Were you told how you could expect to feel after you had the operation or
procedure?
71 66
Afterwards, did a member of staff explain how the operation or procedure had
gone?
80 73
Did you feel you were involved in decisions about your discharge from hospital? 68 63
Were you told how to take your medication in a way you could understand? 81 76
The Trust is disappointed with the results of the annual inpatient survey. As a result, we are doing some
focused work both in the way we measure patient experience and to focus more on what our patients tell us
is important to them. Each Division has a robust action plan to address the in-patient survey overall, these
action plans also address the five key questions outlined below. This will be a particular focus for 2010/11.
However, we are encouraged to have received 85 out of a maximum of 100 for the last two years for patients
feeling they were treated with respect and dignity whilst they were in the Trust. This reflects the priority the
Trust has placed on the privacy and dignity agenda.
The five inpatient survey questions shown below are included within the Commissioning for Quality and
Innovation (CQUIN) elements of 2010/11 contract the Trust holds with its Commissioners and improving
performance is a top priority for the Trust in 2010/11.
Measure 2008/2009 2009/10
Were you involved as much as you wanted to be in decisions about your
care and treatment? 68 68
Did you find someone on the hospital staff to talk to about your worries
and fears? 57 54
Were you giving enough privacy when discussing your condition or
treatment? 78 79
Did a member of staff tell you about medication side effects to watch for
when you went home? 48 44
Did hospital staff tell you who to contact if you were worried about your
condition or treatment after you left hospital?
73 70
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 25 of 34
Privacy Dignity and Mixed Sex Accommodation
The Trust has been working hard to raise awareness of patient's privacy and dignity. Theatre Forums called
'the Patient Experience', have and continue to take place. The feedback from attendees has generally been
positive with staff, patient representatives and volunteers attending.
All Privacy and Dignity initiatives instigated within the last year have been reviewed to ensure that all wards
have adopted them and that they are being embedded into practice.
The elimination of mixed sex accommodation continues to improve with the average daily single sex
breaches continuing to fall. The Trust now has over 90% of patient accommodation as single sex. Our
challenge has been the Assessment Units of which are now the focus of ensuring full compliance. Due to the
challenged within in the Assessment Units the Trust has declared non compliance, but has a milestone plan
uploaded onto the Trusts website for patients' to access to achieve full compliance by June 2010.
Complaints and Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS)
During 2009/10 the Complaints and PALS team were merged into one unit called the 'Patient and Customer
Services Team'. This was to provide a unified approach to complaints and concern handling in line with the
Department of Health recommendations 'Making Experiences Count'. The emphasis within the Trust is to
resolve complaints and concerns as quickly as possible. To assist with this, 'front facing' staff are available
within the main entrance on the Queen Alexandra Hospital site to provide assistance when required.
In 2009/10 a total of 1,241 complaints have been received compared with 1,114 received during 2008/09,
representing an overall increase of 11%.
The following chart shows the top five themes for complaints during 2009/10.
Top 5 Themes for Complaints
All Divisions April 09 - March 10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Apr-09
May-09
Jun-09
Jul-09
Aug-09
Sep-09
Oct-09
Nov-09
Dec-09
Jan-10
Feb-10
Mar-10
All aspects of clinical treatment
Appointment delay/cancellation
outpatient
Appointment delay/cancellation
inpatient
Communication/info to patients
(written and oral)
Admission, discharge and
transfer arrangement
Attitude of staff
The following are examples of actions being taken to address the top five themes:
All aspects of clinical treatment
Clinical Educators have been working with staff in regards to all aspects of clinical treatment with actual
complaints being used as a learning tool. Further to this, staff attend resolution meetings to hear patients
concerns first hand and to ensure that lessons are learnt. Some examples of action taken to reduce
complaints include:
· The implementation of falls, privacy and dignity champions within operating theatres.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 26 of 34
· Ensuring that diabetic nurse specialists are involved on wards sooner if patients' blood sugars are
consistently higher or lower than normal.
· The introduction of VitalPAC and associated early warning systems along with new core patient
assessment documentation to improve communication and documentation.
Out-patient appointment delay/cancellation
The out-patient improvement steering group is reviewing all areas of out-patient department management
including the management of appointment booking.
A text messaging reminder service has recently been introduced to remind patients about their follow up
appointment. Full roll out of the system is due to be completed in June 2010; however, early results are
demonstrating that the new system is having a positive effect on decreasing the number of patients who do
not attend for appointments. The full effect of this service can not be determined until roll out is complete.
Communication and information given to patients
Interactive forum theatre events have taken place throughout the year to educate staff on the importance of
communication in an interactive and engaging way. In addition, the Health Information Centre continues to
provide health events such as TB day and advice on smoking cessation.
Bed side folders containing information useful to patients and their carers are to be introduced during spring
2010.
Admission, discharge and transfer arrangements
The Trust has a whole systems discharge plan in place involving Social Care, Portsmouth City Council and
the Primary Care Trusts. There is a team leading on an electronic discharge summary project with planned
rollout commencing June 2010. The integrated discharge bureau is now in operation and improved discharge
lounge facilities are available until the dedicated lounge opens in the summer 2010.
A near patient pharmacy service is currently being trialled on a number of wards to facilitate timely discharge,
with the pharmacy team being available via a bleep to expedite TTO's (discharge medication) and ensure
patient medication counselling prior to discharge. A paging system to alert outpatients that their drugs are
ready for collection is to be introduced shortly.
Attitude of staff
Customer care training in various forms has taken place throughout 2009/10 and foundation year 1 doctors
received customer care training in January/February 2010.
It is important to acknowledge that the Trust receives a number of plaudits praising the staff and the standard
of care received.
Patient Advice and Liaison Services (PALS)
PALS activity is such that it can vary from simple enquiries, requests for information to addressing immediate
concerns. Having a PALS presence in the main entrance on the Queen Alexandra site has proved to be
effective in resolving some concerns immediately and provides an immediate point of contact for individuals
to speak to member of staff.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 27 of 34
PALS Contacts March 2010
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Surgical
Division
Medical
Division
Executive
Division
CSS DMOP MSK W&C Carillion Transport
In 2009/10 there were a total of 2,279 PALS contacts. Overall activity has increased across the year and this
could be attributable to a greater presence on site and an increase in enquiries during the opening phase of
the new hospital.
Clinical Effectiveness
Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratios (HSMR)
Produced by Dr Foster (the leading provider of comparative information on health and social care services),
HSMR is an indicator of healthcare quality which measures whether the death rate at a hospital is higher or
lower than what would be expected.
How do HSMRs work?
HSMR compares the expected rate of death in a hospital with the actual rate of death. Dr Foster looks at
those patients with diagnoses that most commonly result in death, for example, heart attacks, strokes or
broken hips. For each group of patients they can work out how often, on average, across the whole country,
patients survive their stay in hospital, and how often they die.
When calculating the rates certain factors are taken into consideration such as the patient's age, the severity
of their illness and other factors, such as whether they live in a more or less deprived area.
Dr Foster then compares this with the number of patients that actually die. If the two numbers are the same,
the hospital gets a score of 100. If the number of patients who have died is 10% less than expected they get
a score of 90. If it is ten per cent higher than expected, they score 110.
Care is needed in interpreting HSMR results. Just through chance, some hospitals will have a higher
mortality rate and some a lower rate and it is inevitable that half the hospitals will have a worse than average
result and that some will be quite a lot worse than the average. HSMRs can also be affected by factors such
as data quality, coding or the underlying health of different populations; however, trusts with high HSMRs
must investigate these to provide assurance that the rate is not linked to issues with care and treatment of
patients.
Hospitals which have made efforts to improve the safety of care have been shown to succeed in reducing
their HSMRs.
The graph below shows the Trust's HSMR rate for the period February 2009 – January 2010. From this is
can be seen that the Trust has been consistently below the national average for its HSMR rates (currently
standing at 95.72).
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 28 of 34
Source: Dr Foster – Real Time Monitoring
Releasing time to care
Following a period of intensive testing and development with a number of acute trusts in England, the NHS
Institute launched a series of modules that enable ward staff to increase the time spent on direct patient care.
The Trust has participated in the 'Releasing Time to Care – The Productive Ward' module. This module
delivers ward-based care that is as efficient and effective as possible by empowering staff to be more
productive. The benefits of this include:
· Giving nurses back 10 per cent of their time to spend on patient care
· Creating calmer wards and reduces patient complaints
· Increasing safety (shown in observation reliability scores)
· Increasing morale
· Breaking down barriers between front line staff and managers, and between disciplines.
'Releasing Time to Care' was implemented trust-wide in April 2008, following a successful pilot. To date, we
have successfully introduced the programme to 20 in-patient areas across all the divisions.
Some significant rises to some areas direct care time have been seen. However, while some of the
increases have been smaller than others, all areas have seen a marked reduction in the number of
interruptions they encounter and a reduction in the amount of motion staff have to undertake.
This line represents the
National average for HSMR
rates.
As can be seen the Trust is consistently below
the national average for its HSMR rate
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 29 of 34
The two examples below demonstrate the positive effect of implementing the programme on direct patient
care.
Ward E8
Staff member followed Number of interruptions Direct care
time
Time spent in
motion
RN (team 3) 94 in total = 1 every 3.5 minutes 21% 16.8%
Following introduction of Releasing Time to Care
RN (team 3) 31 in total = 1 every 11.5 minutes 61% 12.8%
Coronary Care Unit
Date
Staff
member
followed
Number of interruptions
Direct
care
time
Time
spent in
motion
Other observations
28.08.08 RN 71 in total = 1 every 5 mins 47% 19%
11% of time spent in
discussion
Following introduction of Releasing Time to Care
27.05.09 RN 57 in total = 1 every 6 mins 53% 14%
5% of time spent in
discussion
Many of the interruptions were reduced by having visible information within the clinical area. The introduction
of the Patient Status at a Glance Boards was a very successful way of ensuring information was visible for all
disciplines of staff to see. It drastically reduced the number of interruptions regarding patient status that staff
often encountered.
Improving outcomes for patients
Whilst in most areas of practice the Trust performs better than the minimum National targets, there are some
areas where the care is held up to be amongst the best practise in the U.K.
· The Trust is a laparoscopic surgery centre of excellence having been designated as a national training
centre for colorectal surgery. A higher proportion of urological cancer operations are performed
through laparoscopy than in other hospitals in this part of the UK.
· Eye surgeons and their teams within the Trust, have some of the best outcomes whilst providing some
of the safest eye surgery in the country. The complication of vitreous loss after cataract surgery is less
than one in a hundred (0.86%) compared to a UK figure over four times that (4.3%). The success rate
for glaucoma surgery is 97% as compared with 80% in the UK national survey and the complication
rate is a fifth of the national series. The rate of closure for macular holes (retinal surgery) is 98%. This
is better than any published series in the UK.
· Our renal unit has some of the country's best performance in haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.
· Our cardiac unit performs in the top 10% related to the British angioplasty database.
The Trust has taken part in national audits looking at the outcome of patients
undergoing various types of cancer surgery. As a result, patients treated here can
expect minimally invasive, high quality surgery and shorter length of stays. For
example, patients with rectal cancer were less likely to need a permanent stoma
and patients with breast cancer were more likely to have breast-conserving surgery
and less likely to have axillary node clearance which can be associated with side
effects.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 30 of 34
· Our gynaecologists have a 96% cure rate after continence surgery; this is well above the National
average.
· Our uterine artery ablation success is better than the national average.
· Our intensive care unit has one of the highest survival rates when compared to similar sized hospitals
and was the first U.K. unit to be granted training excellence by the Australian and New Zealand
intensive care societies.
· Our intensive care unit has state of the art cooling of out of hospital arrest survivors with survival and
neurological recovery as good as any published series.
· In Urology we have one of the best 'stone' services in the country.
· Doctors in pathology were the first in the country to introduce blood screening to look for the spread of
breast cancer so reducing further operations.
· The Trust hosts the South Central Neonatal Network Transfer Service, which moves sick babies
around the 9 neonatal units in the network and sometimes beyond.
There are many other examples of excellent quality delivered by our staff. Many of our consultants have
developed National and International reputations. This is not easy to measure, however, consultant staff and
their teams have been responsible for over 100 scientific and medical papers published in peer review
journals in the last year, over 90 abstracts were also published and consultants reviewed over 250 papers for
journals.
Clinical Audit
The Clinical Audit Department collects information and receives audit registrations and reports on clinical
audit activity occurring across the Trust. It has developed an extensive audit database to capture these
projects.
As well as collating audit registrations, the department collates completed reports of the audit activity to
enable us to provide evidence of good practice, areas of concern or key issues. Actions developed to
address these concerns are also expected as a minimum requirement.
'Sustaining improvements' is the last part of the audit cycle which has proved to be a challenge year on year
and will continue to be a focus for improvement.
Workforce
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust is committed to delivering an improved working life for all staff under the
national Improving Working Lives Standard to become a 'Model Employer'.
National Staff Survey 2009
We undertook the National Staff Survey in 2009. 850 questionnaires were sent of which 31 were ineligible,
378 questionnaires were completed and returned, equating to a 46% response rate, which is below average
for Acute Trusts in England.
National Staff Survey 2009 – ranking compared with all acute trusts
Pledge Description
Ranking,
compared with
all acute trusts
in 2009
Staff Pledge 1: To provide all staff with clear roles and responsibilities and
rewarding jobs for teams and individuals that make a
difference to patients, their families and carers and
communities.
Lowest 20 %
Staff Pledge 2: To provide all staff with personal development, access to
appropriate training for their jobs and line management support
to succeed.
Lowest 20 %
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 31 of 34
National Staff Survey 2009 – ranking compared with all acute trusts
Pledge Description
Ranking,
compared with
all acute trusts
in 2009
Staff Pledge 3: To provide support and opportunities for staff to maintain their
health, well-being and safety.
Average
Staff Pledge 4: To engage staff in decisions that affect them and the services
they provide, individually, through representative organisations
and through local partnership working arrangements. All staff
will be empowered to put forward ways to deliver better and
safer services for patients and their families.
Lowest 20%
Additional theme: Staff Satisfaction Lowest 20%
Additional theme: Equality and Diversity Better than
average
Whilst improvements have been seen in a small number of indicators, the 2009/10 staff satisfaction survey
results clearly demonstrate scope for improvement. A Steering Group, led by the Chief Operating Officer,
has begun work to create and roll-out a campaign that aims to bring the recently agreed Trust values to life,
whilst at the same time tackling the underlying causes of the areas of concern staff raised in the survey.
Oasis Wellness Centre
The Trust recognises the hard work PHT staff have put into caring for others, as a result in May 2010 the
Oasis Wellness Centre was opened which provides the following facilities:
· Access to an indoor heated swimming pool
· State-of-the-art gym equipment
· Opportunity to join a range of fitness classes
· Health and wellbeing advice in multi-purpose consulting rooms
· Therapies suite
· Seminar rooms
The Therapies suite and Seminar rooms are open to local small and medium businesses that can pay for
access, which provides income generation for the Trust.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 32 of 34
Quality Account Statement 2010 PHT – NHS Portsmouth
Commissioners fully support increasing transparency within the NHS by providing patients and residents with
information on the quality of the services provided for them. Quality accounts also provide an opportunity for
the services to demonstrate their commitment to their patients and the quality culture developed within their
organisations.
Quality improvement is a continuous process. The information presented within these quality accounts
should simply reflect the ongoing work that has occurred throughout the year and that which is planned over
future years. The production of quality accounts therefore should not become a burden on providers.
The production of quality accounts for all providers has been a challenge this year. Guidance on their
structure and content was not published until late last year. This has meant it was difficult for them to develop
their quality accounts and take them through their governance systems within the specified timelines.
However, commissioners fully expect that all providers will meet these deadlines next year.
The information provided in this quality account is accurate from the checks the commissioners have
undertaken. Commissioners have a good but challenging relationship with Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
(PHT) and support the priority areas selected for improvement. Next year commissioners also expect the
quality account to strengthen its focus on how PHT has engaged and involved all stakeholders in their quality
improvement work throughout the year.
The Department of Health will be undertaking an evaluation of all quality accounts published in 2010.
Commissioners will work with PHT to ensure that any learning and recommendations are incorporated in to
future accounts.
The economic outlook over the coming years is bleak. Difficult decisions will need to be made on how
resources within the NHS will be used to achieve the best outcomes for patients. It is imperative that patients
and the care they receive always remain the primary concern.
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 33 of 34
Portsmouth Local Involvement Network (LINk) Commentary on Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
(PHT) Quality Accounts 2009/10
The Portsmouth Hospitals NHS trust Quality accounts document appears to be a comprehensive statement
of the Trust's position with regards to national priorities and commitments, identifying areas of satisfactory
performance as well as areas needing improvement.
Detailed Local Involvement Network (LINk) comments are as follows:
· The establishment of a Governance Leads Forum – whilst instigating yet another committee – has the
potential to enhance standards of governance across the Trust and to ensure that evidence of good
practice, as well as the lessons from poor practice, is shared Trust-wide.
· Falls remain a problem nationally and are proving hard to prevent in Acute Trusts. PHT's initiatives in
this area are important. The LINk believes that education for patients and training for staff are the
keys to reducing the incidence of falls.
· The initiative to test new shock absorbing flooring as part of a national clinical trial could prove an
additional measure in reducing the effects of falls. However, the LINk believes that there can be no
substitute for the education of patients, especially those believed vulnerable to falling, and staff
training to ensure that pre-emptive action is taken in all ward areas to avoid such incidents.
· The fact that dietetic input for Oesophago Gastric Cancer is under-provisioned is a point of concern,
especially when related to funding constraints in the existing economic climate.
· The LINk supports PHT's initiative to increase investment in its ability to provide End of Life Care at
QAH across all wards and believes that the Liverpool Care Pathway should be extended to all wards.
· The LINK is strong in its support for the implementation, nationally and locally, of single –sex
accommodation for patients. The difficulties experienced by the Trust in complying with the national
ruling on single-sex accommodation in Assessment Units at QAH are recognised. However, the LINk
urges the Trust to press forward as quickly as possible to the point where mixed-sex wards are a
thing of the past.
· The LINk inherited an acute awareness of the need for comprehensive, consistent and standardised
infection control measures throughout the Trust from its predecessor organisations and congratulates
PHT staff on the huge improvements made in this area. Infection Control will remain as an ongoing
project for the LINk to monitor performance in this vital area from the standpoint of complete
eradication of healthcare acquired infections from our hospitals.
· The LINk has an ongoing project to investigate ways to improve inter-agency working by health and
social care organisations generally, and has been involved in initiatives particular to discharging
patients from hospital. Better internal communications within PHT, Portsmouth tPCT (and now
including Solent Healthcare) and Adult Social Care – as well as between these organisations – is
seen as vital to improving patient outcomes and experience in the discharge process. Proposals to
improve the experience for patients leaving hospital but needing support in the community in order to
do so are a step in the right direction. However, this is not a problem for the Acute Trust to resolve in
isolation; only better and faster inter-agency communications and cooperation will eventually
improve the discharge process, thereby releasing beds and ensuring that patients do not
remain in hospital inappropriately.
Shaping Health & Social Care
Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust – Quality Accounts 2009/10 Page 34 of 34
Appendix 1 – Research Activity Summary
Total NIHR Supported
(*As % Of Total)
Research Activity
2009

2010
2008

2009
Increase
2009

2010*
2008

2009
Increase
New Projects Submitted to PHT R&D 114 76 50% 69
(61%) Unknown Unknown
Total Projects Approved to Start 74 41 80% 49
(66%) 20 145%
Total Projects Ongoing 243 207 17% 142 (57%) 104 37%
Active/Open to Recruitment 179 112 60% 98 (55%) 52 88%
In Active Follow-Up 49 50 -2% 44 (90%) 45 -2%
Completed 15 45 -67% 1 (7%) 9 -89%
Accruals/Recruitment
Accrual Target 1281 Unknown Unknown 1081
(84%) Unknown Unknown
Actual Accruals 3268 Unknown Unknown 3136
(96%) 901 248%
Ongoing Projects by Funding
Category
Commercial not for Commercial
Gain 20 21 -5% 14 (70%) 14 0%
Commercial Contract 32 23 39% 8 (25%) 0
Charity 79 63 25% 67 (85%) 48 40%
DH 37 28 32% 25 (68%) 14 79%
Other Government 1 2 -50% 1 (100%) 1 0%
Research Council 21 21 0% 21 (100%) 19 5%
Unfunded/Student Work 20 19 5% 0 (0%) 0 0%
University Funded 10 9 11% 3 (30%) 3 0%
Unfunded 10 8 255 0 (0%) 0 0%
Other Funding 13 13 0% 3 (23%) 5 -40%

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